The Beatles? The Zutons? Nah, it's all about the new generation of bands
Sam Meaghan
14:46 5th April 2016

Liverpool often comes in twos. Like there are two birds, two football teams, bit of tenuous link, but two sides of the Mersey river, but there are always more than two good bands. Or as most people think, one good band. 

Ingrained in the culture of the city would be the music of Te Beatles. The city still earns 82 million pounds yearly off the back of The Beatles, but something that is, rightfully so, ever changing, are the sounds that the city produces. From Post-Punk through to Psychedelia, here are 15 bands that prove Liverpool is still going against the grain, and well, just doing what it likes. 

  • WSTR: Alex Turner once famously said, "That rock ' roll eh? It never dies" Whilst that is true, he should have said something about pop-punk. WSTR are living proof of a genre of music people thought stopped at You Me At Six, actually having a lot more to it - giving it some fuel, fire and a whole lot emotion. The band is currently out on tour with Creeper and Neck Deep in Europe. They also have one of the best one-line appearances in debut music video 'Graveyard Shift' (Waster? Waste of fuckin' space, more like!). 'Close to perfection' is how Rock Sound described their debut EP, SKRWD. Make sure you pick it up.

  • Windmill: Contemplative and atmospheric - Windmills are a chilled sound, pensively loaded with this underlying theme of what will happen next. Their recently released album, Wanderlust, has been played by local radio stations and hailed by the press. The band are set to have a great year ahead of them.

  • VYNCE: Having Raw Power Management though which is Don Broco, Charlie Simpson and At The Drive In, this year is about to get very interesting for VYNCE. Their sound is shamelessly pop but prides itself on the guitar work of both singer and guitarist, Peter Pegasiou and Jack Kelsey.

  • The Vryll Society: Signing to Deltasonic Records, the home of The Zutons and The Coral, would imply that The Vryll Society follow the simple Liverpool sound. But they actually stray away from that. Their sound could be likened mostly to a mix of Joy Division with Wolf Alice, dark but excitable.

  • The Tea Street Band: Their music is like one big constant reference to Madchester... But they are actually from Liverpool. They sound similar to The Happy Mondays but without the baggage (jeans and famous addiction to drugs), and probably with more synths. They have a love affair with proper guitars and proper house music. Some would say that they're mad for it. Clean, euphoric and everything Tony Wilson wish he could have signed. Baggy brilliance.

  • The Sundowners: It's unusual to hear a band genuinely go down the path of the Psychedelic genre in modern music, but that is exactly what The Sundowners have done. Their video 'Into The Light' shows that the band are unapologetic about sending your head a little bit funny.

  • The Hummingbirds: You'll never find a band that oozes civic pride quite like The Hummingbirds. One of their biggest hits is even called, 'When I'm Back in Liverpool'. Priding themselves on the Mersey Beat sound of The Beatles, the band have even found themselves with quite a large fan base in Berlin, just like the young Lennon and McCartney pair.

  • The Cheap Thrills.: The Cheap Thrills have really went through the motions as a band. They've been around for ages, worked on a sound most like Arctic Monkeys meets Jamie T, to then change their sound to a shoegaze epic. Latest track 'Machine' is a particular highlight. The band has also been over to Dublin in support of Cast.

  • She Drew The Gun: She Drew The Gun's most recent release, 'Poem', has been featured on BBC 6 Music. Most remarkable about this band's sound would be the lyricism of frontwoman, Louisa Roach. They've toured Europe with Fink, and supported The Coral in Brighton. They could be likened mostly to a quiet Courtney Barnett, with the constant flow of lyrics, but incredulously simple music.

  • Seprona: Seprona are the birth child of Arctic Monkeys' wildly popular album, AM. Their latest single, 'Trap Door', features a guitar driven sound, but a lyricism that could only be considered a direct reference to that of Turner's poeticism on Arctic Monkeys' seminal album.

  • Katie Mac: There is a really large amount of female musicians taking the scene by storm in Liverpool at the moment. Most notably would be the emergence of Katie Mac. Her sound is similar to the classic Mersey Best sound with a twist focusing more on folk. Her operatic and astoundingly big vocals add so much more to what could be a simple sound.

  • Johnny Sands: Whilst the troubadour is often imagined as being a hairy guy on stage with an acoustic guitar, Johnny Sands has decided to bring the term up-to-date. He can often be seen live with a guitar, and about a million wires hooked up to his laptop. His sound is emotive, haunting and at times a little bit like OMD's classic 'Enola Gay'.

  • Haarm: Interestingly, Haarm came out of pretty much nowhere. Their release wasn't pre-empted, it just happened, and when it happened, it was featured on Q as their Track of the Day. Their debut release 'Foxglove' features a grotty and riveting bass that shakes your bones, and contains anything promising menace to leave you hanging on. With vocals coming from both male and female vocalists, Chris Mackintosh and Jennifer Davies, respectively, Haarm's soothing yet big sound is one that will grab your attention immediately.

  • Carbon: Another Liverpool band who have went through several rebrands, Carbon have settled with their newest name, and come back with a considerably stronger sound. 'Go Home' is a quintessential example of what Carbon are about. It boasts an eclectic arrangement of riffs, mixed in, for good measure, with some melodramatic lyrics.

  • LIVES: Described by NME as a 'blast of adrenaline' LIVES don't stray too far away from that very apt description. Erratic but melodic all the same, and ultimately essential.


Photo: Press